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Assessing the effects of population growth and climate change on sustainable blue-green infrastructure (Case study – Qazvin)

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conference contribution
posted on 02.02.2021, 04:03 by Marzieh Rezaei Ghaleh

This item is part of: Boarin, P., Haarhoff, E., Manfredini, M., Mohammadzadeh, M., Premier, A., (2021). Rethinking Sustainable Pacific Rim Territories. Proceedings of the 2020 APRU Sustainable Cities and Landscapes Hub PhD Symposium, Future Cities Research Hub, School of Architecture and Planning of the University of Auckland. ISBN: 978-0-473-53616-9


ABSTRACT

Over the past century, population growth and climate change have affected most cities in developing countries, being damaged extensively at different scales. For instance, in Iran, the historical sustainable blue-green infrastructure (BGI) is under pressing pressure. However, sustainable BGI could support the environmental, social, and economic sustainability and mitigate as well as adapt to climate change. Qazvin, the historical Persian garden city in the middle of Iran, is a valuable sample of sustainable adaptation to drought and water shortage. Due to the urban development process, population growth, and climate change during the last century, Qazvin has lost a significant part of its historical blue-green infrastructure. This paper aims to assess the effects of population growth and climate change on sustainable BGI in Qazvin and offer appropriate solutions for conserving and rehabilitating sustainable BGI. The research methodology is the case study method. Hence, the principles of environmental, social, and economic sustainability dimensions in the blue-green infrastructure are identified. Data related to population growth, climate change, and urban development in Qazvin are collected, and the effects of these factors on sustainable BGI are analyzed. Finally, the proposed mechanism implementing the sustainable BGI adapted to climate change and urban development has been introduced.

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Future Cities Research Hub, School of Architecture and Planning of the University of Auckland

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